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#90042 Finally Diagnosed, but...

Posted by joplin1975 on 29 June 2014 - 04:43 PM

So what's holding you back?

I don't ask to be a jerk, I'm being serious. I know Hashi's sucks. I know how it impacts quality of life. I know how it makes hard things that much harder. And I know how frustrating it is to compare yourself to people without these types of conditions and think how much easier they have it.

But, when the rubber meets the road, it's not a death sentence. Therefore, you are making the choice to let it control your life. If you want to further your education, do it. If you want to finish a project, do it. Don't make Hashi's the project or the focus of your life. Power through it. Make the decision not to let the disese control you.
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#154369 Good Doctors

Posted by jenny v on 05 June 2016 - 03:49 PM

We often have posters on this site searching for new doctors who are open to a variety of treatment options to help patients feel their best (it can be a challenge to find one!). We like for posters to share their doc recommendations via private message versus on the site, but there are several sites online to help with your search. I found my integrative doc through the Thyroid Change site and it has a page that lists doctors who are open to the right tests and thyroid medications. I'm sharing a link to it in case anyone else needs help in their search.

 

http://www.thyroidch...or-list-us.html


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#99287 Layman's article about getting a second opinion

Posted by Octavia on 17 April 2015 - 05:36 PM

Normally, I don't give much credence to Yahoo articles. But I do like this one about getting a second opinion.

 

http://news.yahoo.co...-230833266.html

 

 

Two things that caught my attention:

 

People should not worry about upsetting their doctors by getting a second opinion. It happens so frequently that doctors are used to it, Mishori said. "If the doctor's offended, you probably don't want to go to that doctor," Mishori said. "This is about you," she said.

 

And...

 

Patients who seek a second opinion should let their first doctors know, Mishori said, and patients will usually need the initial medical tests for the second opinion. In some cases, the two doctors will talk to each other about the case. "It's a learning opportunity for everybody," Mishori said. "It shouldn't be an adversarial process."


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#97834 PC said that taking anti anxiety pills is just a bandaid

Posted by Octavia on 05 March 2015 - 02:44 PM

Same goes for RAI and TT it's all a big bandaid for what's really causing graves doesn't take it away so what's the point the only thing that i can even come up with between 2008 when my levels were normal to 2011 is a flu vaccine I was forced on by my boss and because it causes antibodies in your system is this possibly antibodies that could trigger graves I can't think of any infection or virus that I had during that time frame:/ other than the flu vaccine anyone wondering what the cause is ??

 

If your doctor is saying these other "solutions" are just a band-aid, what does he/she propose for a more permanent solution?

 

Let's say for a moment, just for the sake of argument, that your guess is correct about the flu vaccine triggering your thyroid antibodies. What could you do with that information? What's done is done, and you can't turn back that clock and undo the vaccination. Look forward, not backward. Since you can't impact what's happened in the past, what can you impact in the future?


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#146009 depressed

Posted by Octavia on 19 April 2016 - 01:12 PM

You're right: surgery is a very personal decision, and I'm sorry to hear that you don't believe you fully considered all aspects of it and now you regret your decision. 

 

That said, I am going to lay out some tough-love here in the spirit of helping you move forward. I think a big part of what's preventing you from feeling better is your attitude/outlook. Please hear me out. What I see in your posts is an overwhelming amount of negativity and a lack of productive thinking and problem solving. You appear to be getting frustrated and giving up, blaming doctors, blaming us, etc.  I believe you would be better served by taking a step back and asking "What can I do, what can I say, how can I have a different conversation with my doctor, or how can I switch to a new doctor in order to start feeling better?"  The current approach is clearly not working for you.

 

Your labs are showing definite room for improvement with non-thyroid levels. I know you said your current doctor said he/she didn't want to increase your thyroid meds, but what about those other things? Ferritin? Vitamin D? Those need to be addressed, too. You're going to continue to feel terrible until those things are addressed.

 

How persistent have you been with this doctor? Have you truly been assertive with your needs, or do you simply take no for an answer? If you've truly been persistent and assertive, well, then it's time to look for a new doctor, in my opinion. Your care is up to YOU. Own it. Take charge. Get what you need. Don't give up.

 

Now, I'm not kidding myself. I know this message will not be received well. But I do hope you at least take a moment to consider what I'm saying, because I truly do want you to feel better.


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#99393 Levoxyl and Cytomel question

Posted by Lovlkn on 22 April 2015 - 04:56 PM

Isn't this fun?

 

Certainly it needs to change.

 

HOW?  HOW can we change the way medical professionals treat Thyroid patients?

 

Hearing the stories day after day about how doctors who are SUPPOSE to KNOW - simply have no clue.

 

I am off my soapbox.

Thanks for reading.


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#97970 4 Year Chronic Cough?

Posted by Octavia on 08 March 2015 - 03:50 PM

Interesting. I suggest asking your doctor for a thyroid ultrasound. If your thyroid is enlarged and/or has a nodule, it can make your neck feel "crowded" and could make you feel the urge to cough or clear your throat.


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#90133 Foods to Avoid with Hashimoto's

Posted by surge on 01 July 2014 - 05:19 PM

Most sedentary adults-- with or without autoimmune issues-- would benefit from a better diet. For the most part, we get way more dairy and meat than we 'need' and way less fiber and fruits and veg, as you know. If you want to feel like you're helping your body stay strong, feed it a strong diet. Lots more veggies. A big salad every day for lunch or dinner-- it should be the whole meal. Use seeds like pumpkin seeds or sunflower to tip in a little protein. Make sure to vary the veg and even throw some fruit in there. The first day or two, you might feel hungry but you can add a little cheese or meat. Also, you'll find you start looking forward to the meal.

 

it doesn't need to be immaculate nutrition in order for you to see benefits. You can take small, easy-to-manage steps, like: eating the salad 1x a day OR throwing out any crackers, chips and cookies OR starting with a really great breakfast, like some eggs and a green smoothie or some oatmeal with berries. I also love Mark Bittman's idea of Vegan before 6-- that you try to be a vegan during the day and eat what you want at dinner. This plan has good consequences on all kinds of levels. How you feel energy-wise, how your immune system reacts, and  as an added benefit, it lessens our impact on the planet. Nice.

 

*I do limit dairy and don't eat gluten. I came to these choices just by watching my own body's reactions. And I should mention-- I don't eat 'substitutes'-- not a lot of gf products or soy. I sometimes use almond milk. I just try to build my diet around plants with some meat or fish a couple of times a week. I don't think my 'recipe' fits everyone. I think it's a fair point that trying to control diet might be an illusory way of trying to control an uncontrollable situation, but I also think, that we all should eat well and I'll always encourage that.


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#89915 doctor appointment did not go well

Posted by CA-Lynn on 26 June 2014 - 11:42 PM

My experience, having fired several doctors over the decades, is that the TRULY good ones have tons of experience with the disease AND know how to listen to the patient AND are confident in their skills so that they can basically treat intuitively and not solely by blood test results.

 

I believe that those who go solely by the test results do so because they have not yet developed the skills to see the whole picture and feel confident in thinking outside the box.

 

Hey, you gotta' kiss a lotta' frogs before you find a prince.


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#89696 Newbie Here.. Stressed and depressed

Posted by joplin1975 on 21 June 2014 - 08:25 PM

Autoimmune disease do tend to come in clusters. I appreciate wanting to be prepared, but if don't think anyone can give you percentages of developing another issue...well, at least not with any degree of accuracy. Unless you count allergies, I haven't developed anything else.

Again, I get it. It shakes us up when our bodies don't cooperate. That said, I can't help but think you have two choices here: 1) educate yourself about Hashi's, be proactive and conscientious about your health, figure out what you need to do to feel your best, and then go on and re-start living your life to its fullest; or, 2) fixate on the maybes and possibilities while the world passes you by.

My thyroid cancer could reoccur. How often do I really give it much thought? About 15 mins a year, when I go in for annual testing. I'm a stubborn chick...I wouldn't dream of giving that disease that much power over my life. Keep your head up, you are going to be fine.:)
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#87347 New here with nodule on ultrasound

Posted by joplin1975 on 17 April 2014 - 01:06 AM

Welcome!

Ultrasounds are used to just look at the structural characteristics about the thyroid. The scans don't really say what the nodule is or why it's there.

The vast, vast majority of thyroid nodules are benign.

That said, there are characteristics of thyroid nodules that make the nodule more suspicious for things like thyroid cancer. Dominant nodules that have calcifications do tend to be more suspicious.

So, of course, I say the "C" word and I very much know how scary that is, but thyroid cancer is highly treatable with an excellent prognosis. So if you do have to deal with it - and that's still a very big if - know that you (and the kiddos) will be just fine. :)
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#85758 What to eat and not eat - confused?

Posted by joplin1975 on 04 March 2014 - 04:17 PM

What I have done and continue to do is...eat normally. :) Do I avoid goitergenic foods? No.  Do I eat them in moderation? Yes, as with anything else. I don't do gluten-free. It's never bothered me and I don't think thyroid disease automatically means you have a gluten sensitivity. But, if you do, by all means, avoid it.

 

I'm a believer in fresh food, trying to minimize the processed stuff, and sticking to high protein, low carb, low-ish sugar diets.


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#85682 newly diagnosed questions about treatment

Posted by Swimmer on 03 March 2014 - 02:51 AM

Hi, I'm going to answer you in what might seem like a strange way.

 

A diagnosis of hypothyroidism can mean so many different things for different people over time.  Instead of going in to all of what you can read about, I'm going to tell you some nice things about it.

 

The up-side of a hypothyroid diagnosis:

 

1.  You finally understand why you've been so emotional or worrisome when perhaps you didn't used to be and that helps you understand wow, that' s a symptom?  Ok, I'm going to work to shut that off then.  Meanwhile, when you get the right thyroid hormone all worked out, right dosage, right type, etc., finally, your emotions can start levelizing, normalizing, and you can begin to feel normal (when you're on the right amount of the right thyroid hormone for you.)

 

2.  You finally understand why the pounds were so hard to move, if they were for you.  Again, for some, getting the right dosage of the right thing that works for your body (thyroid hormone- synthetic or natural (dessicated) may mean that finally, maybe the pounds will move, or at least you understand why they didn't and you can work to come up with ways to try and move them.

 

3.  You finally understand why you're always fatigued.  When you finally get on the right dosage of the right type of thyroid hormone for you, life becomes better, and you're not always so fatigued.

 

4.  For some, they actually get to a place where thyroid hormone is no longer needed -- (I know two of these people personally -- one is a woman with Hashimoto's and another is a women with hyperthyroid.  I see them about 1x per week so this is for real).  (I am not encouraging anyone to stop taking thyroid hormones -- for people who need it -- it is VERY necessary).  But just so you know, not everyone has to be on them forever.

 

5.  Some people find that there are triggers for their Hashimoto's (for those who have it).  Some people successfully discover what ticks off their thyroid and that stopping those things calms it down.  That's what I personally am hoping for in time -- but it's a lot of work, so one step at a time.

 

6.  Some people learn that our bodies demand rest...  So I wasn't designed to run the Boston Marathon - -that's okay -- I'm happy about the exercise that's good for me personally.

 

I hope that's some encouraging help for you while you wait on your journey.  As someone else mentioned recently, MANY people are doing VERY well and you don't find them here -- they're off enjoying life & living it...  ;)

There's a lot of hope & healing on this journey.


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#85395 Recently Diagnosed Hashimoto

Posted by CA-Lynn on 22 February 2014 - 08:02 PM

I want to remind everyone that the infinite majority of Hashimoto's patients do EXTREMELY well on Levothyroxine and other drugs. They are usually not found on this forum. Instead, they're out enjoying life. So everyone newly diagnosed should be optimistic!


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#161457 Question for those who have had a total thyroidectomy

Posted by joplin1975 on 02 August 2016 - 12:15 PM

I think it really depends on how well you are medicated post-surgery.

 

I was severely under medicated after surgery (TSH of 121) and gained 27 pounds. Once my meds were in a good place, I lost all of it and am back to normal. 

 

You need to find someone who will not focus on TSH only, but who will test for free t4 and free t3 AND who is open to using t3 meds, if needed. If you find that person, you shouldn't have any problems. 


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#153897 diagnosed 7 years, rare form??

Posted by jenny v on 01 June 2016 - 05:19 PM

If you guys could post in the new section when it becomes available, that would be great. I'd love for your experiences to be public here because it seems like most of you suffering don't have anyone to share with and it might help others in the same situation who stumble across this site.


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#139154 Surgeons with more annual thyroid removals have lower risk for complication

Posted by Octavia on 16 March 2016 - 05:58 PM

http://www.upi.com/H.../?spt=slh&or=14

 

This article supports the advice we often give here to find a very experienced surgeon.


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#134674 1 month post op-my success story

Posted by Mike1973 on 26 February 2016 - 04:22 AM

Sounds like you had a completely routine surgical experience, which is good!

I was VERY happy with the surgeon and think I made the right choice by doing some research and finding the best one locally that I could (and would encourage everyone to do the same.  I polled a very well known neurosurgeon and my primary care dr. and they both gave me the same name).  I'll take routine all day long :)


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#114081 So I'm the husband of the woman who has Hypothyroidism

Posted by Michael on 28 October 2015 - 03:09 PM

Good morning. 

 

One small stroke of progress over here:   Today we have  a plumber coming to the house to fix the kitchen sink.   Our "normal"  is that I would stay at home and deal with these folks ......she stays back in the bedroom.

 

So this morning,  she asks why I'm still here (in the house),  and I said that the plumber is on his way.   She actually looks exasperated,  and says :  "Go to work, it's not like I can't talk to the plumber.........."

 

While I WANTED TO SAY was something like "for the last 3 1/2 years you have been the biggest hermit known to man,  so why would I expect anything different ......" ,   but suffice it to say,  I didn't,  and I just left for work.

 

No doubt,  it's a victory.  I'll take it.

 

Have the wonderful day.


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#100118 Can you have hypo and hyperthyroidism?

Posted by joplin1975 on 24 May 2015 - 09:33 AM

First, I'd say that while we absolutely understand what you are going through, self-medication is always a bad idea.

Secondly, yes, you can swing from hypo to hyper rather rapidly. It's very tough.

Can you get copies of all your blood work with the reference ranges? We can be more helpful if we have your lab info. Do you have any feelings of "fullness" in your neck? Have you had a thyroid ultrasound?
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